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By David Wheatley

Writing in Poetry assessment Roddy Lumsden stumbled on reason to compliment David Wheatley’s ‘wilfully notable shape and rampaging vocabulary’, whereas within the TLS Peter examining counseled his technical assets as ‘an unobtrusive excitement to read’. A Nest at the Waves, taking its name from the people trust that petrels lay their eggs at sea, ruminates on subject matters of commute, leave-taking and displacement. From his local County Wicklow in terms of East Yorkshire the place he lives, the poems hint an arc of tours, real or imagined, to Australia, Africa and Antarctica. Migrant staff, migrating birds and nomadic tribes enact whatever of the drama of the place domestic will be. From shamanism to the lives of saints, responses to the Donegal gaeltacht and homages to musical heroes (Brad Mehldau, Ali Farka Touré), David Wheatley’s curious, wide-ranging and now frequently open-ended verse supplies grounds for Maria Johnston’s remark within the Dublin overview of Books that ‘the experience of danger in Wheatley’s paintings turns out limitless’.

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Writing in Poetry evaluate Roddy Lumsden came upon reason to compliment David Wheatley’s ‘wilfully extraordinary shape and rampaging vocabulary’, whereas within the TLS Peter interpreting recommended his technical assets as ‘an unobtrusive excitement to read’. A Nest at the Waves, taking its identify from the folks trust that petrels lay their eggs at sea, ruminates on subject matters of go back and forth, leave-taking and displacement.

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Sample text

It was published in 1986 with Michael Hartnett’s English translations, but without the original Irish text. This was an upsetting 19 Proinsias Ó Drisceoil, “Review: Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill, Selected Poems/Rogha Dánta”, Poetry Ireland Review 24 (1988), 41–42. ”20 As Ní Dhomhnaill explained to Mike Murphy, how and why this occurred “had to do with the spirit of the times. ”21 A revised, second edition in dual-language format was released in 1988. The edition provided a precedent in publishing and was a significant event because it placed an Irish-language text on equal footing with an English one.

Ní Dhomhnaill herself has been criticized for her use of macaronic language in, for example, “Éirigh, A Éinín” [“Rise Little Bird”]. ”8 There is also the issue of the marginalization of women in the canon. 9 And so, poetry in Irish is a complex topic in terms of issues surrounding the decline of the language, the gender-based oppression of women within both its traditional forms 7 8 9 Gabriel Rosenstock, “Spíonáin is Róiseanna, Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill”, Poetry Ireland Review 39, 1993, 104. Frank Sewell, Modern Irish Poetry, A New Alhambra (Oxford: OUP, 2001), 195.

Her consistent subversions and reimagining of conventional literary forms and themes, her interventions into religious, political and social ideologies, her lifelong engagement with both of Ireland’s major languages and the relationship between the two, and her ongoing involvement in revising the Irish literary canon to include the contributions of women also make her a key figure for the new millennium of Irish literature. Ní Dhomhnaill brings forward ancient, traditional themes of Irish language literature and gives them renewed vigour and contemporary relevance.

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